Files Uploaded, Now We Wait

I found Kindle Create a breeze to use and successfully created a textbook replica file of 5 Acres & A Dream The Book. Then I created a JPG cover file. I uploaded both files to KDP, reviewed the interior in the online previewer and clicked on “Publish.” Now it will be reviewed and hopefully should be live on Amazon within the next 72 hours.

Using Windows Software on a Linux Machine

So if I want to convert a PDF copy of 5 Acres & A Dream The Book into an eBook, how do I do that if the conversion software isn’t compatible with my operating system? The answer? I must create a virtual machine on my computer that can run Windows. How do I do that? With Oracle’s VirtualBox.

VirtualBox is virtualization software. It can be installed on any host operating system, and be used to run a huge variety of guest operating systems. My host OS is Xubuntu Linux. My guest OS will be Windows 10. VB does this by partitioning off a small section of my hard drive and installing Windows there. When I start VB and choose Windows, it opens Windows in a private space within Xubuntu. On my desktop it looks like any other window. If I maximize that window, then you’d never know it was any other than a Windows machine.

Once I had VB installed I added the VB extension pack. After I installed Windows, I added Guest Additions. Both of these increase the functionality of Windows as a guest OS on my computer.

The challenge, then, is to share files between the two. I have my PDF on Xubuntu, but since Win 10 is sandboxed, how do I let Windows access it? And how do I get a copy of my finished Windows work back to my regular OS? For that I had to create a shared file as part of a networking system between Xubuntu and Windows. Once I had that created and added my PDF file, I was able to download and install Kindle Create within Windows and get started on my project. The completed project is saved to the same shared file, so that I can upload it to KDP when it’s ready.

From Paperback to eBook: 5 Acres & A Dream The Book

Five years ago when I published 5 Acres & A Dream The Book I didn’t give electronic publishing a thought. I wasn’t especially big on eBooks, because I like nothing better than the look and feel of a real live book in my hands. I like seeing books on my bookshelves. And I like knowing that the books I want to read and keep will be available, even if my electronic device is not.

Finally, out of curiosity I bought a Kindle. I found that I liked the convenience of being able to keep numerous books on a small, handheld device, especially fiction. Then I began to dabble with creating eBooks for my Little Series of Homestead How-Tos. I learned the differences in formatting and how to make a flowable book for eReaders. I didn’t find them very convenient for images and graphs, however. I couldn’t fathom the many homestead maps in 5 Acres & A Dream The Book being legible on a small electronic device; it was hard enough to see them on the pages of a 6×9 inch paperback.

The real show stopper, however, was the file size of both 5 Acres & A Dream The Book and Critter Tales. Both are photograph heavy (something my husband thought was important), so the interior book files are quite large. Too large for the maximum limits of most eBook producers. So the idea was moot even if I had wanted to take such a plunge.

Recently the idea has come to mind once again. While Smashwords still maintains a 10 MB maximum file size limit, Kindle Direct Publishing and Lulu and greatly increased theirs. So much so that my most optimized PDF version of both books is within the new limits.

Even with this new possibility there is a problem. Most eBook publishers prefer to convert .doc files. These are easy enough to make and upload, but for my paperback books I never created a ready-to-print .doc file. I created PDF/X files, which is the standard preferred by print publishers. To create a .doc (or .docx) file would mean starting from scratch! Honestly, I have too much on my plate to do that; I’d rather continue working on 5 Acres & A Dream The Sequel.

The other day something at KDP caught my eye – Kindle Create. Kindle Create is a program which can convert PDF files into “Print Replica eBooks” for Kindle. It maintains the print book’s layout and formatting while converting it into a mobi file. That sounded like the perfect solution for me.

The “glitch” is that Kindle Create must be downloaded to use and is for Windows or Mac only. Since I use Xubuntu Linux, that is indeed a problem. But not an unsolvable one. More on that next time!