From Paperback to eBook: 5 Acres & A Dream The Book

Five years ago when I published 5 Acres & A Dream The Book I didn’t give electronic publishing a thought. I wasn’t especially big on eBooks, because I like nothing better than the look and feel of a real live book in my hands. I like seeing books on my bookshelves. And I like knowing that the books I want to read and keep will be available, even if my electronic device is not.

Finally, out of curiosity I bought a Kindle. I found that I liked the convenience of being able to keep numerous books on a small, handheld device, especially fiction. Then I began to dabble with creating eBooks for my Little Series of Homestead How-Tos. I learned the differences in formatting and how to make a flowable book for eReaders. I didn’t find them very convenient for images and graphs, however. I couldn’t fathom the many homestead maps in 5 Acres & A Dream The Book being legible on a small electronic device; it was hard enough to see them on the pages of a 6×9 inch paperback.

The real show stopper, however, was the file size of both 5 Acres & A Dream The Book and Critter Tales. Both are photograph heavy (something my husband thought was important), so the interior book files are quite large. Too large for the maximum limits of most eBook producers. So the idea was moot even if I had wanted to take such a plunge.

Recently the idea has come to mind once again. While Smashwords still maintains a 10 MB maximum file size limit, Kindle Direct Publishing and Lulu and greatly increased theirs. So much so that my most optimized PDF version of both books is within the new limits.

Even with this new possibility there is a problem. Most eBook publishers prefer to convert .doc files. These are easy enough to make and upload, but for my paperback books I never created a ready-to-print .doc file. I created PDF/X files, which is the standard preferred by print publishers. To create a .doc (or .docx) file would mean starting from scratch! Honestly, I have too much on my plate to do that; I’d rather continue working on 5 Acres & A Dream The Sequel.

The other day something at KDP caught my eye – Kindle Create. Kindle Create is a program which can convert PDF files into “Print Replica eBooks” for Kindle. It maintains the print book’s layout and formatting while converting it into a mobi file. That sounded like the perfect solution for me.

The “glitch” is that Kindle Create must be downloaded to use and is for Windows or Mac only. Since I use Xubuntu Linux, that is indeed a problem. But not an unsolvable one. More on that next time!

Transferring Titles to Ingram Spark

With all of the problems indie authors have been having with Amazon’s replacing CreateSpace with Kindle Direct Publishing, I thought it might be a good time to transfer my paperback titles to a more stable platform. This is possible because I own my books’ ISBNs. As long as I use the same files with the same ISBN, I can have my books printed from as many sources as I wish. In fact, many authors publish through both Ingram Spark and CreateSpace, because IS gives greater royalty flexibility for non-Amazon distributors. For books sold through Amazon, royalties are higher for books published through their printers, hence the strategy to go through both.

The process of transfer was certainly easier than directly uploading the files to IS. I created an account and then contacted IS staff, explaining what I wanted to do. They advised me to reach out to CS to give them a heads up, and then remove all my titles from Amazon’s Expanded Distribution. Expanded Distribution covers all non-Amazon sales. Royalties are smaller through Ex. Dist., which is the reason for choosing IS for these sales.

It took a while because my request was initiated right before the big push to close CS and get everything moved to KDP. But both sides were cooperative and very helpful, and eventually, I received word from IS that the transfers were complete. Now I have to learn their ropes! Best of all, transferred files don’t require the IS processing fee, so moving all four titles was free.

My new titles will be be published through both KDP and IS.

Prepper’s Livestock Handbook ready for pre-order!

It’s almost hard to believe that my newest book is done and ready to hit the presses. So many days filled with writing and re-writing, that it’s hard to believe it’s done! Here’s the TOC.

Intro: What is Homesteading? Why Homestead? Who Is This Book For?
Chapter 1: First Things First
Chapter 2: Best Breeds for Self-Reliance
Chapter 3: Barns, Shelters, and Fencing
Chapter 4: Forage and Feed
Chapter 5: Breeding and Pregnancy
Chapter 6: Blessed Events: Birthing and Hatching
Chapter 7: Eggs, Milk, and Meat
Chapter 8: Keeping Them Healthy
Chapter 9: Keeping Them Safe
Chapter 10: Keeping Things Manageable
Conclusion: If SHTF

192 pages with a list price of $15.95, it will be available on June 15 in both paperback and eBook formats. It can be pre-ordered now at:

Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Independent local book stores everywhere (Follow the link to find the one nearest you.)

The Deadline Loometh

February 1st is approaching and there’s no way to stop it! But I’m making good progress and hope to be going back through my manuscript soon to work on continuity and whatever I left blank in hopes of better inspiration at a later date.

I have to say I am so glad that I asked for an extension on the manuscript deadline. The original deadline was December 1st, which has come and gone. Even though I thought I could meet it, I figured I’d better give myself a little more time and so asked for February 1st just in case. The homesteading life isn’t one that can often be put on hold until a future date. When it’s time to harvest, it’s time to go pick fruits or vegetables before they fall to the ground and rot. Then it’s time to preserve the heaps and mounds accumulating on the countertop! When it’s time to plant for fall pasture and a winter garden, then it must be done or there will be none until next year! And then sometimes I just have to get up and walk away from the computer.

As much as I don’t like the pressure of a deadline, I have to say that having it has helped me establish a more steady routine with my writing. Now after morning chores, I head to the computer and start writing. At lunchtime I take a break and then switch gears for the afternoon because I’m ready for it. This has established a habit that I hope will serve me well once Prepper’s Livestock Handbook is finally put to press. (They changed the title after reading my first 5,000 words.) Maybe I’ll be able to be more diligent on my self-published projects! At least I’m hoping so.

Now back to work.